Your Insomnia is Making You Fat!

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Your Insomnia is Making You Fat!

A new Swedish study shows that insomnia increases the risk of obesity by affecting our metabolism.

We have covered the importance of sleep in several articles here on thehealthydiy.com, and this new British study proves the importance of a healthy night’s sleep.

The study found that those with disrupted sleep patterns can pile on the pounds by an impacted appetite and exercise response.

The more nights you spend tossing and turning may even affect your gut bacteria, which has a known role in metabolism, the study adds.

Study author Dr. Christian Benedict, associate professor of Neuroscience at Uppsala University, Sweden, said, “Since perturbed sleep is such a common feature of modern life, these studies show it is no surprise that metabolic disorders, such as obesity are also on the rise.” He added, “It may be concluded that improving sleep could be a promising lifestyle intervention to reduce the risk of future weight gain.”

Insomnia sufferers who took placebo pills felt more rested than those who get no treatment at all, according to 13 studies conducted by the University of Sydney.

Their study found that the mere act of taking a pill eased the anxiety that makes it hard for some insomnia sufferers to fall asleep, the researchers said.

The scientists examined data from 13 studies with a total of 566 insomnia patients assigned to either receive a placebo that they believed was an active treatment or take no pills at all.

Placebo patients reported improvements in their ability to fall asleep, the amount of rest they got and their quality of sleep, according to results, published in Sleep Medicine.

Comparing placebo against recognized insomnia therapies can give inaccurate results as just believing you are receiving a sleep-inducing treatment can ease the condition, the researchers said.

Study author, Dr. Ben Colagiuri, said, “The comparison with no treatment means that we can be sure that the improvement we observed was due to a genuine placebo effect, rather than being an artifact of simply taking part in a trial,” according to a Reuters report.

Researchers from Uppsala University, Sweden, conducted some studies to investigate how sleep loss affects metabolism.

They analyzed the human response to food after sleep deprivation.
Results revealed sleep-deprived but otherwise healthy people prefer larger portions, sought more calories, were more impulsive with food, got more pleasure from eating and burned less energy.

The researchers also found sleep loss shifts the balance of hormones from those that promote fullness to those that cause hunger.

A lack of shut-eye also increased levels of particular receptors, known as endocannabinoids, which enhances our appetite.

The findings were presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Lisbon, and also revealed sleep loss reduced insulin sensitivity and altered our gut bacteria balance, which is associated with metabolism.

Study author, Dr. Christian Benedict said,”Since perturbed sleep is such a common feature of modern life; these studies show it is no surprise that metabolic disorders, such as obesity are also on the rise.” He added, “My studies suggest that sleep loss favors weight gain in humans. It may also be concluded that improving sleep could be a promising lifestyle intervention to reduce the risk of future weight gain.”

The researchers are still investigating whether extending sleep in insomnia sufferers can restore alterations in appetite and metabolism.

A UK survey was just conducted and found ‘Insomnia’ is the most searched for symptom on so-called ‘Dr. Google’.

The condition receives an average of 74,000 searches into the site each month.

Diarrhea is the second most commonly searched symptom, amassing a total of 49,500 Googles a month. Sore throats have 40,500 monthly searches.